It started with an island…

“Let’s do this…”

Famous last words, right?!?

Hey, it’s winter, the farm is quiet, lets relax and contemplate life…

Nah.

This is how a typical thought goes in these parts. With our little farm, we can always do something, fix something, improve something…always something. ūüôā

One quiet morning we looked at the kitchen island, that we’ve pretty much always hated and thought, “Hmm, let’s find something bigger!” In theory, this sounds great but in reality, I am a bit¬†of a frugal gal, so going out and spending a ton of money makes my stomach churn. ¬†Paying someone else to do something that I can figure out…no way. ¬†I am a bit of a DIY gal an autodidact, a big word that I recently read somewhere meaning, a self-taught person, and thought “that is me!”.

Out of sheer frugality and stubbornness my love affair with Annie Sloan paint began. I am a researcher at heart, I want to know all of the variables and the best way to do something before I begin. Not because I am a perfectionist, but because I don’t want to do it over. If you ask my husband, he’ll tell you that I am not a fan of backtracking, so doing something over, drives me nuts. Out of my research, I found Annie Sloan Chalk paint. Since that fateful day in early January, I’ve refinished a buffet and small dresser¬†for the kitchen islands (then we topped them with walnut), ¬†all of the kitchen cabinets, ¬†4 dressers , a large mirror and an antique hutch. ¬†I can honestly say that I am addicted to refinishing furniture with this stuff. No sanding, no priming just paint, lightly sand and wax. I am always on the prowl for new thing to refinish. God love my husband, he picks them up for me and brings them home. He does not complain when I sold our perfectly good, newer bedroom set for 2 old and mismatched dressers that I then refinish to match. He does not say a word, actually he helps, not painting, but searching and finding new pieces. The really cool part of if all is that it costs us next to nothing and we usually come out making a little! It’s like a game of shells, we sell a piece and buy a piece, usually for less, refinish, sell, buy a piece, buy paint (which lasts a long time) and so on.

It started with an island…

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Before

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During

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During…

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Hard to believe that these were pieces of furniture!

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Before and after

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Before and after

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Before…

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After…still looking for the right pulls.

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Before and after

 

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My apothecary!!  I have wanted a place to store my potions and lotions forever!

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This is so old that the glass has bubbles in it! Love!

Swoon worthy….every piece! ¬†I am in love with my new found friend Annie Sloan and all of our “new” old furniture.

If I can do it..You can too! ¬†Try something new, learn something new, don’t be afraid.

No more CSA…

For the past 3 or so years, we joined a local, organic CSA from their start up. While we loved it at first, we found through the years that we weren’t able to really save anything for the winter and although we are culinarily adventurous, we had produce in the CSA that we never used. ūüė¶ ¬†So we were looking for a better way for us to have enough for the summer AND have plenty to can without having to pay farmers market prices for extras.

We were bouncing around the idea of a greenhouse, which is a big expense and not at all pretty to look at on our small property. ¬†I did not want to commit to an expense like that as I was not really comfortable in my black thumb gardening of the past so I suggested that we do a trial garden instead, to see if I could indeed grow things on a larger scale. ¬†You see, I’ve had gardens in the past, from purchased¬†seedlings, that I’ve basically given up on mid season, every single year. ¬†Things get busy, weeds grow tall, I HATE hornworms and bugs…those types of things, so I was not convinced that I could do this, at all.

We had saved some seeds from the produce that we got at the farmers market to can last fall. ¬†Unfortunately, the kids mixed all of the tomato seeds, so it was sort of a crap shoot what we would have for tomatoes. ¬†What we also didn’t¬†know is that your open pollinated squash¬†second generation saved seeds can produce hybrid mutts of the squash world, which we have quite a few of. They’ll be interesting for sure when we crack them open. ¬†Lessons learned. ūüėČ

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Since putting in the 1 acre pig fencing last year, it left us with the old pig area which was super compacted and really rocky.  We decided to find some way to try and amend the soil while adding more growing medium to the whole area.  We found an organic dairy just up the road who was selling their composted cow manure.  Score!  The pigs had really made the already unworkable land, really unworkable so it was our only real option.  They delivered 2 dump trucks full and we got to spreading.  The kids were right there with us, knee deep in cow poo!  Man, I love those kids!

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Once we got it piled into mounds, we planted what little seedlings survived (which was not a lot despite my loving hands and pro grow lights)…which¬†left me feeling a little defeated. ¬†My first foray into starting seedlings indoors left me with stalled growth at best and nothing growing at worst. ¬†Any who..the little ones went into the ground and I replanted the failed ones from seed.

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After weeks of weeding and watering we began to see life!  That was the most exciting part!  I put these seeds into the ground, watered them and they GREW!  Crazy huh?!?  I knew how it all worked and had planted many times, but this year, something clicked.  It was as if someone had set off a button in my head that allowed me to really appreciate what was happening.  I spent lots of time in the garden, weeding, picking bugs off the plants (grow your own damn plants bugs!) and watering.  I talked to the plants, I actually thanked them all daily for the bounty that they provided us to sustain us now and through the winter.  It worked!

To date, we’ve canned over 200 jars of different sauces, relishes, ketchup, pickles and salsas. ¬†I’ve frozen quarts and quarts of green beans, zucchini, carrots, corn and pea pods. ¬†And stored away in the cellar are 50+ squash, yes even the hybrid mutts.

Moral of the story, the¬†experimental season in the garden has been a success and I don’t think we’ll be needing a greenhouse after all. ¬†We have a way to go and are constantly learning, there will be some tweaking for sure but I believe that the words for this season are grateful and thankful. ‚̧

There really is something so rewarding about growing your own food once you see it as a privilege and not a chore. ‚̧

Seriously, if I can do it….anyone can!

How was your gardening season?

How 25 fuzzy butts turned into 35…

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Just a few short weeks ago, we got our 25 new chickies in the mail….well it was supposed to be 25, but 27 fuzzy butts showed up. ūüôā ¬†Yay for extras!

Man, did we have issues getting chicks this year. ¬†First off, we’ve never ordered¬†this early. ¬†We started looking in February, after the Valentines day massacre (that’s what we’re calling it anyway) when we went to close the girls up for the night and found one of them pecked to death. ūüė¶ ¬†So sad, we had no idea what happened at first. ¬†We thought something had gotten into the coop, but there is just no way for that to happen so we deduced that it must have been one of the other hens that did it. ¬†That and she had blood all over her beak…that was the obvious clue. ūüėČ

So we decided that rather than chance another going rogue, we made an appointment to send them away to freezer camp. ¬†That left us chicken less…for the first time in 5 years!! ¬†It was odd not tending to them daily. ¬†Then the littles arrived and I was back on chicken mamma duty. ¬†I figured that we’d get them free ranging by 8 weeks or so, but I neglected to do the math. ¬†You see, the chickens as yummy, friendly and egg filled as they are here for tick control. ¬†They love to eat ticks! ¬†That is the whole reason that we have them. ¬†I am deathly afraid of ticks. ¬†They are creepy and carry disease. ¬†YUCK! ¬†We don’t want to use¬†chemicals on the lawn so that the kids don’t get Lyme disease, only to end up poisoning them, that seems like a bad plan. ¬†So enter the chickens. ¬†Although they free range year round, I like to get them out as soon as the snow starts receding so they can get a jump on the bugs. ¬†But, as I said earlier…my calendar and my math skills did not sync up this year so we had not birds to eat the bugs early on.

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About 3 weeks old

Anywho…Our first day outside this year and I see a tick crawling on the tiny blonde hairs leading to my baby’s angelic face. ¬†Cue the freak out!! ¬†AGGHHHHH!!!!

There is no way that I could wait the 4 weeks until the little ones could get out to eat the bugs so the search was on.  Within 2 days we had found 8 organic laying hens and within a week they were re-homed to our little farm and eating all of the bugs that their little hearts desired, as well as tearing up my flower beds.  A small price to pay for peace of mind.

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The “older”gals

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Meeting each other for the first time.

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First day in the sun!

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Escape¬†artists…they popped right¬†through the fence!

I love these birds.  They are funny little creatures to watch and interact with and just having them roaming around feels like home.

So…Welcome all 35 fuzzy gals! ¬†We’re glad to have you!

What to do with that fresh ham steak??

Last year when we butchered our first batch of pigs, we kept the ham fresh because the butcher used nitrates in curing and that is something that we don’t want in our food so we decided that we’d cure it ourselves.

It was a BIG ham and we’d never done anything like that before. ¬†Long story short, because it was so big, the cure didn’t penetrate through the whole thing and only the outer 3 inches tasted like ham, the rest like a delicious pork roast. ¬†No harm, no foul…it was still delicious. ¬†Just not “ham” as we know it.

Fast forward to this year with a new butcher (still nitrate curing) and fresh ham steaks vs. a whole ham. ¬†2 of the ham steaks I threw in the crock pot with apples and onions and they were good, but drier then I’d like. ¬†This week I pulled out the last 2 steaks and decided to try curing them, again.

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Cured ham steak

For 2 steaks about 3/4 inch thick

In a large shallow baking dish for the brine:

1.5 qt of water

1/3 cup organic brown sugar

1/3 cup organic maple syrup

1/2 cup sea salt

1/2 teaspoon organic vanilla

Mix it all up until the sugar and salt are dissolved.  Put in the ham steaks in and made sure that they stayed submerged (you can weight it down with a plate if you need to).

Place it in the fridge for about 24 hours.

Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees

After 24 hours, rinse the brine of well.  Dry off the ham steaks very well.  Pan sear the steaks in a frying pan with some butter or even better bacon fat!!! Mmmmm..

When they are browned on both sides, place the pan (make sure it is oven safe) in the oven for about 20 minutes.  Depending on the thickness of the steaks, it may take longer or less time to cook.  Make sure your pork is 145 degrees in the thickest part.

Pull out of the oven and let rest for a few minutes…then eat!! Yummy!!

I served this with sliced potatoes roasted in bacon fat and sea salt and steamed cauliflower finished in the oven.

It felt like a frontier meal to me (minus the cauliflower of course). ūüėČ

The kids gobbled it up and the hubs was in awe of the impromptu ham experiment.

All in all a great meal and the leftovers of ham and potatoes made an excellent breakfast skillet the next morning. ūüôā

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Cured Ham Steak

‚̧

The Dinner Party….

Our son hosted his first dinner party this past week!

He’s 7. ūüôā

This child has been groomed to be a foodie. ¬†He was never given the option to eat or not eat. ¬†His only option was try it once, if you really don’t like it, then you don’t have to eat it. ¬†To this very day he eats everything, except mushrooms

Lately his favorite show to watch is the Pioneer Woman! ¬†He loves to watch her cook and his favorite episode is “Ranching in the mist”. ¬†He has watched this particular episode so many times that he knows the recipes and the wording by heart. ¬†The last time he watched this episode, he asked again if I could make the pop pulled pork. ¬†Well, we don’t really drink soda , so cooking with it is out of the question for me, so I’ve said ¬†no in the past to that recipe.

That same week we were all struck with the flu…boooo! ¬†The hubs came back from the store with a natural soda called Dr. Better, because sometimes you just need something carbonated and it tasted just like Dr. Pepper!! ¬†Light bulb!! ¬†When everyone was feeling better and Ree Drummond was again on the screen, he asked again and this time I said sure!

He did the entire meal by himself!  I put everything in the oven and made the dough (which was Gluten free) but he did the rest from chopping onions to peeling and slicing the apples for the pie.

The hubs took the little one away for a few hours so we could have some space alone to work, and work he did!  He started at 11:30 am and finished when dinner was served.

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Cutting Onions

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Seasoning the pork shoulder

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Adding a little Dr. Better

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Slicing apples for the flat apple pie

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Cutting the cabbage for slaw

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Mixing up the slaw

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Making the potato au gratin (yes, he diced all of the potatoes) ūüôā

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The finished pop pulled pork!

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Dinner is served!!

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Making caramel for the pie

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Pie is done!

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My guy! Sorry for the bad picture. 

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The whole meal was delicious! ¬†The gluten free dough was so good! ¬†You could never tell that there was no wheat in it at all. ¬†The caramel was not my favorite recipe…it was a quick caramel and it lacked the depth that I love in caramel, but I wanted to stay true to the Pioneer woman evening, so we made all of her recipes. ¬†I would certainly make them all again, with the addition of¬†this salted caramel. ūüėČ

I loved the feeling of pride that I saw on my little guys face when everyone was eating HIS dinner! ¬†He was exhausted when bedtime rolled around and I think a little bit more appreciative of the meals that we eat…knowing a little bit better what actually goes into them.

He is already planning his next party with meatballs, pasta and cake.  I love that he loves being in the kitchen and I love even more the time that we get to spend together cooking.

‚̧

Gluten Free Eating and Apple and Onion Roasted Pork…

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So‚Ķ.I’ve embarked on this gluten-free journey and so far so good!

 I have been so tired with a general feeling of crapiness for such a long time now, that I figured it was time to try something different.  Years ago, when the low carb craze hit, I did it and felt great (of course, I was a lot less fluffy then *wink, wink*)…but I remember feeling great.

¬†We eat great quality foods. ¬†We eat organic foods with no preservatives or GMO. ¬†We eat lots of fresh produce and meats that we raise ourselves (organically) or that we buy from friends who also grown organically. ¬†We cook almost all of our meals at home, so we know what goes into them. ¬†We don’t use chemicals in our home and use homeopathy as a means of getting ourselves well and ¬†food based remedies as well. ¬† ¬†We eat raw garlic and I make a bone broth (stock) at least once a week. ¬†Why in the world am I so tired and icky?? ¬†I’ve been feeling that wheat/gluten is the culprit for a while but haven’t made the jump until now. ¬†You see‚Ķ.I LOVE bread! ¬†It is what I eat when I don’t feel good, it is what I eat when I do feel good, some form of flour is always being eaten here at home as a meal or with a meal.

I thought that the transition would be harder, but honestly, it hasn’t been!! ¬†I feel better, have more energy (I’m not ready to run a marathon yet‚Ķ) and am not craving the bread like I thought I would. Yay!

Sooo…as I embark on this journey I will create new recipes, I will try new recipes and let you know how they turn out!

My first official GF recipe is a Roasted Apple and Onion Pork Shoulder.  You could easily use a pork roast or tenderloin too!

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Ingredients:

4-6 lb Pork Shoulder (Pasture or organically raised if possible)

Bacon Fat saved from breakfast (you can use olive oil and butter or coconut oil)

5 Cloves of sliced Organic garlic

2-3 Medium Organic Onions, sliced

2-3  Organic Apples, sliced (skin on)

16 oz (or so) of organic chicken stock (homemade would be best)

1.5 Tbl Organic Balsamic Vinegar

3 Tbl Organic Maple Syrup

3 Tsp Organic Cinnamon

Salt and Pepper

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Put about a TBL of bacon fat into the Dutch oven on the stove on a med-high heat and sauté the onions  and garlic.  Once they are beginning to brown, add the apples, cinnamon and the balsamic vinegar.  Cook for a few more minutes then  remove from the pan.  Add about a TBL of bacon fat to the pan.  Generously salt and pepper all sides of the pork shoulder.  Sear all sides of the pork to create a beautiful brown crust.  Once all sides are browned, add the chicken stock (should come  about 1/2 way up the pork) and scrape the sides of the pan with a wooden spoon to get all of the yummy splatters into the sauce.  Add the onions, garlic, apples and maple syrup to the pot.   Cover and place in the oven for 2.5- 3 hours or until the roast is easily pulled apart with a fork.

Remove the roast (or roast pieces as it will probably fall apart) from the pan and set aside. ¬†With an immersion blender directly in the pot, buzz the juices, apples and onions together to create an amazing gravy. ¬†I may have splashed a bit of maple syrup into the gravy before buzzing‚Ķ ūüėČ

Crock pot Option:  I would assume that you could throw all of this into a crock pot, put it on low, go to work and return to an amazing dinner too!!

Although I did not get any pictures of it, I served this with organic carrot sticks roasted in olive oil, salt and pepper and with roasted organic acorn squash.

Roasted Acorn Squash:

Halve the squash carefully as they have a tough skin

Scoop out the seeds

Add a small pat of butter to each half of the squash

I added a teaspoon of brown sugar, salt and pepper to the squash

Roast for at least an hour at 350 degrees or until very tender.  Spoon the juices from the middle of the squash over the squash and scoop out onto the plates.

The kids LOVED this entire meal‚ĶI thought the Hubs was going to dive into the pan, he was nuts over it. ¬†I’m glad that I wrote it down!

Here we are‚ĶA New Year!

Whoa! ¬†As wonderful as 2013 was for us, it was by far the busiest I think we’ve ever been in our business and in our personal life. ¬†It isn’t until we look back that we see exactly where we’ve been and what we’ve done. ¬†I am so very thankful and feel very fortunate that we were able to accomplish all that we have this past year‚Ķwithout any mental breakdowns (although we were close!)

This New Year, my goal is to visit here more‚Ķto write more, for me and for the kids. ¬†To really put forth a great effort and push on their schooling as we have a bit to catch up on and the allow them to be kids through it all. ¬†I want to have more field trips, less craziness and more calm. ¬†One can hope at least. ūüėČ

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Before…

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During…

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After… (Play Area)

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After… (School and Office Area)

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After…(School Area with Magnet Wall)

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After…(Office)

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After…(New Stairs)

We’ve finally finished (well, mostly) our new school/play/office and added a bathroom. ¬†It was a ton more work than we thought it would be, I blame HGTV for that. ¬†They can redo and entire house in an hour‚Ķwhy can’t we put an addition on our house in 3 weeks‚Ķseemed like a no brainer to us! ¬†As we found it, it doesn’t work that way and I thank the contractor that raised the roof, so to speak, for not laughing out loud in our faces for even suggesting it. ¬†His portion was done in 2 weeks which left us to do sub-floors, wiring, framing, ¬†bathroom, floors, insulation, sheet rocking, taping, sanding, mudding‚Ķblah, blah in a week. ¬†Well, lets just say that 6 months later we are just finishing up. ¬†We had some family help along the way. ¬†My father in law was with us for a 2 week stint that turned into 5 weeks. I do believe that him being here saved our marriage from ruin as the Hubs and I don’t do projects together very well, or we didn’t until this rather large project came to be. ¬†His knowledge was invaluable and I learned so much!

So here we are! ¬†The best part of all of this, was that it all happened so fast that there wasn’t much time to think “what the hell are we doing, we don’t know how to do that!”. ¬†I watched a lot of you tube to learn and the rest we figured out.

¬†We haven’t planned any big projects for this year, thankfully, ¬†but may add a little something to the farm‚Ķat least we are talking about it any. ūüėČ

Master Tonic..it’s for all that ails you!

I have a confession to make….I HATE being sick.  I am sure that no one likes being sick, but I HATE it.  I am a giant baby when I am sick and I tend to panic, which makes things worse, way worse.

I will do ANYTHING to avoid being sick which is nearly impossible when you have little petri dishes walking around touching everything and then touching their faces, eyes, mouths, each others faces, my face. ¬† I’ve even turned my head a time or two only to have a tiny hand shoved in my mouth, because suddenly a 4 year olds hand is an ice cream cone that “Mom ¬†just has to try!”. ¬† Ahhh‚Ķboundaries.

Anywho, I found this recipe last year for this super tonic hailed “Master Tonic” because I was looking for natural ways to keep us all from getting sick. ¬†We take our vitamins, drink our elderberry syrup, I made stock often, we were eating organic, but we were still getting sick. ¬†I happened across this article¬† from Heal Thyself and we’ve been making it ever since. ¬†You have to think ahead enough to make it for when you need it as it takes a couple of weeks to steep. ¬†We take it at the hint of a throat tickle or if anyone else is sick, we double, triple up. ¬†It is a little hard to take at first and it may run right through you, but it gets easier every time and actually I enjoy the taste now, well most of the time anyway. ūüėČ

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Master Tonic!

1 part fresh chopped organic garlic cloves
1 part fresh chopped organic white onions
1 part fresh grated organic ginger root
1 part fresh grated organic horseradish root
1 part fresh chopped¬†organic¬†Cayenne¬†peppers, jalape√Īo, Serrano, Habanero, African bird peppers….any combination of the hottest peppers available

**Please use fresh and please use organic ingredients

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There are many versions from rough chopping to putting everything in the food processor.

Wash all ingredients. Chop and fill a glass jar ¬†(or 2 or 3) ¬†3/4 of the way full with the ingredients. ¬†Fill the remainder of the way with Organic apple cider vinegar. ¬† We use Bragg’s, but any OCV with the mother will do fine.

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Cover and shake.  Move all of that vinegar around to fill air bubbles.  Top off the jar with more vinegar.  Seal and wait.

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You should shake it when you walk by, but at least once a day.

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You can put herbs in it as well. ¬†I’ve been cooking with turmeric lately, so I may just throw some in there. ¬†Fresh thyme would be good as the¬†essential oils in thyme are packed with¬†anti-septic, anti-viral, anti-rheumatic, anti-parasitic and anti-fungal¬†properties.

It is recommended that you make it with the new moon and strain it on the full moon (about 14 days). ¬†While I try to follow this, I don’t always. Sometimes you just need it quicker. ūüėČ

On the 14th day ( or round about there) strain your tonic into glass jars and keep in a dark place.  I keep one on the counter in a darker jar and the rest go in the cupboard.  The last batch (the 2 large jars) yielded about 4-5 pint-sized jars of the tonic.  Some folks save the strained out parts for soups and stocks.  I think I might do that the next time too!

Be wary of smelling it when making it…it WILL clear your sinuses.

The very first time I tried it, it was a strange feeling, I took a swig and felt it go straight down into my tummy warming along the way. ¬†An odd feeling to say the least, but it works! ¬†Knock on wood, everyone around me has fallen to ¬†some sort of cold/flu already multiple times this year. ¬†I am still standing. ūüėČ ¬†Sometime I get a very miniscule versions of what others have, but so far, never a full blown cold/flu.

There you go…Master tonic!  Make, drink, stay healthy!

~~~~~

Want to know more??

Here is a ¬†little bit more information on why this all works‚Ķsomething to read while you wait 2 weeks for your tonic. ūüėČ

Horseradish Root: From the same family as the mustard and cabbage family and has anti scorbutic and expectorant properties. The root reportedly cures tonsillitis and is a natural treatment for rheumatic and respiratory disorders. The root is also laden with a potent amount of vitamin C and B complex, minerals, potassium, calcium and iron as well as enzymes. It is a natural antibiotic which can kill bacteria in the throat that cause bronchitis. Horseradish heats up the body and has a cardiotonic effect (strengthens the heart). The glucosinolates found in horseradish are thought to increase resistance in humans to cancer. These glucosinolate compounds are only found in plants which are in the mustard family such as horseradish, mustard, broccoli and cauliflower. They have powerful anti-oxidant properties. It is interesting to note that a study in 2005 showed that glucosinolates increase the liver’s ability to detoxify and eliminate carcinogens. Horseradish contains an enzyme that aids in the breakdown of the glucosinolates which makes it easier for the human body to benefit from its therapeutic properties.

Ginger root: The ginger root is actually an underground stem. It may have blood thinning properties and cholesterol lowering properties. Compounds found in ginger known as gingerols have analgesic, sedative, anti-pyretic (lowers fever) and anti-bacterial properties. They also have anti-fungal properties that supposedly are effective against even athlete’s foot. Ginger contains protein, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin C, choline, folic acid, inositol, manganese, pantothenic acid, silicon and a small amount of vitamin B3. Ginger has good properties for menstruation problems, and many say that it is good for settling and upset stomach.

Garlic: Garlic contains antiseptic properties and it helps to lower blood pressure and bad cholesterol, is an appetite stimulant and is good for the hair! Garlic is known to be anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic as well as a blood purifier. There are recipes for treating tuberculosis, whooping cough, rheumatism, ringworm, pneumonia, wounds and ulcers, parasites, asthma, high blood pressure, digestive problems and acne. A cut garlic clove rolled on pimples several times a day will make the blemish disappear without a scar. Rubbing garlic over ringworm will burn out the infection. The skin falls off leaving healed skin behind. When cooking with garlic, by chopping or crushing the garlic clove and letting it rest for a few minutes before adding it to the dish you are cooking gives the anti-cancer properties a chance to form so that they are transmitted into the food even after it is cooked.

Onions: Onions contain phytochemicals called flavanoids. One flavanoid called quercitin may inhibit tumor growth and keep colon cancer at bay. A newly discovered compound in onions may actually inhibit bone loss in menopausal women. Onions contain vitamin C and chromium, B6, biotin, folic acid, vitamin B1 and K, and healthy sulfur compounds as well as enzymes. They also have anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-histaminic properties and are a source of fiber.

Peppers: Red peppers contain lycopene which protects against cancer and heart disease. Peppers contain large amounts of phytochemicals that have antioxidant capabilities such as chlorogenic acid, zeaxanthin and coumeric acid. Hot peppers also stimulate blood flow in the body, but cayenne pepper is also good for helping to stop bleeding. I have applied some to a cut finger before, and it helped stop the blood flow.

Raw apple cider vinegar: Apple cider vinegar is made by fermenting apples in a wooden barrel. It contains calcium, iron, sodium, potassium, malic acid, acetic acid, pectin, potassium. Pectin is good for the colon, regulates blood pressure and also removes bad cholesterol. Malic acid is good for fighting infections, as it is anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal.

Information above from Fair Hill Farms.  Thank you!!

I am a mom and Chef by training‚Ķnot a medical professional. ¬†Everything posted on this blog has been used by myself and my family and is for informational purposes only. ¬†That being said…I do hope you try it and let me know how it works for you!

A litte bit of Mexico…

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Perhaps the hubs was longing for our honeymoon to Mexico…Perhaps he looked around and saw nothing in the house to eat??

Anyway…

When the man is home on a weekend that we aren’t running around…then he is cooking Which is fine by me!!. ¬†¬†Enter the homemade corn tortillas.

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As I finished my own work, he was busy mixing and resting dough. ¬†He had his Sous Chefs by his side and together they were rolling while the littlest Sous was pressing. ¬†My little guy was so incredibly proud of himself that he showed me each and every tortilla before they were cooked. ¬†Which left me getting very little work done, but hey…them be some yummy tortillas made by a super kid! ¬†I am very lucky. ūüôā

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While Mj pressed, Mark cooked.

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This went on for a good while until we had a giant stack of warm, salty, corny (he, he) tortillas.

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We ended up with tostada like yumminess topped with grass-fed beef, our own canned beans, organic corn, organic salsa and the BEST sour cream out there…Wallaby!

 Seriously, this stuff is almost drinkable!

Anywho…Here is the link to the recipe that was used. ¬†We were able to find organic masa harina too! ¬†NO GMO corn here…ever! ūüėČ

Give it a try…It is super fun for the kids too!